Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 4:15

1/2 of College Grads Working Jobs Dont Use Their Degrees. So What! (Episode 13)!

Now, that's the key thing, that last part of the sentence, the first job after graduation. The journal also states that of the grads and non college level jobs a year after leaving college, the vast majority of them remained underemployed a decade later

#college #employment #student #academia

Erica Jean
@HeyItsErica · 4:16
So I don't want to shun college, even though I have, I still shun college a little bit because of the debt. But I do see the advantages I have, to be honest. It's a place of learning. And yes, there are projects that you do within college, some hands on experiences here and there, but any job would welcome a well learned person
Erica Jean
@HeyItsErica · 2:45
Jobs want a well learned person. So say that a person majors in political science, but they end up going into, let's say, a business industry or marketing or communications. The fact that they completed school is wonderful to a job. This is why a lot of the managers I had in the past, I will always ask them what their major was. I was just always curious. And you know what they would tell me? English. English

@MotivateMeU

Two, how we're equipping college grads through the process of the college degree, let alone any other considerations with respect to culture, economy, society, et cetera. Right? I mean, any other time you look at a statistical analysis of human behavior, particularly if we're talking about an investment of number of years, so time as well as money, you're not going to see a near 50 50 breakdown of those who applied themselves and who didn't. Right?
Angela Kaye
@AnngieKaye · 4:10
Once you've laid a foundation and you at least have some sort of steady income coming in, then you can go for whatever else you want but use a bachelor's to eat with. And so that's pretty much what I've done and taught my son. You can go back for a master's if need be, for whatever, but at least make sure that you are employable after spending four years and $100,000 in school
Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 4:40
So from a purist standpoint or perspective, okay, and I teach at a college, but I am what you would refer to as a practitioner with 30 years of experience in my field, and now I'm teaching it. Okay, but then you have the pure academics that their focus is just on academia. But college overall should take on the lessons from technical schools, from VoteC, and the latter part of one's college experience, particularly for traditional college students
Michael Knight
@MK1981 · 4:56

@MotivateMeU

I think you can get away with it by just doing certificate programs, like one or two courses on coursera or Google or something like that. And you're prepared, you're ready, and you can get experience doing other things, I think, unfortunately, and as someone who really values education, I think college has seen its time in its past for maybe more hands on type of things, like medicine and certain engineering. I think you will still need kind of a training school for that
Michael Knight
@MK1981 · 2:45

@SeekingPlumb

Hello. And I just wanted to reply to what you posted because I think, I just want to say, like, I really appreciate your point of view often. Because when you post things, I think it just makes me feel good to know that I'm aligned in the thinking with someone else. And maybe this is probably more because your canadian roots that you see education in the way that you do
Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 3:51
But then again, having five minutes, I guess, is a good thing. But anyway. All right, I got to be real quick about this. You made some really excellent points. Yes, college is so much more, as far as for a traditional student, is so much more of an overall collective, holistic experience than just going to classes

@MK1981

What they found was that kids who went through that education, it had these radical impacts on their adulthood with respect to the types of jobs they got, being able to get a mortgage and a car and maintain those things over a period of time. But if we're only looking at the college degree, only looking at what someone is or isn't doing in that period of time
Michael Knight
@MK1981 · 2:33

@SeekingPlumb

Maybe I should figure out a way to just buy less stuff from them or even it out. We're not even thinking that way. Everything is zeroed down to what's best for me in the short term and not thinking about the long term. I'm rambling right now, but it's just like, conversations like this make me think, like, why can't we take better care of one another? What is stopping us from that?
Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 4:58

@MK1981

So many companies are out there that will pay for your college. Full boat from bachelor's to master's, and some will pay for a doctorate. There are even part time opportunities with many companies where you can work part time hours and still get them to pay for college. That's the golden ticket right there. If you don't have the other resources, the financial resources available to you, that's what I would do. Okay. So you have to be strategic
Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 4:58
Or I've known many of people who have gone to law school, and then they decided, I don't want to be a lawyer, but they've spent thousands, thousands, hundreds of thousands of dollars on their degree. And now what? That is their choice. Okay, but if you listen to Anne's response to me, and she was very eloquent and made excellent points, that I also argue, which is, for the traditional college student, college is a holistic experience
Michael Knight
@MK1981 · 4:31

@MotivateMeU

Well, education reimbursement policy for a lot of different organizations. And at present, the most you're going to get is $5,250, because right now, that is the maximum amount of credit the government will give you back. Right. So you're allowed to claim a $5,250 deduction per employee as business or corporation. So when you get reimbursements from a company, that's about as much as you're going to get. And that's a good thing. If college tuition wasn't so expensive
Leanne Pritchett
@TheMs.Leanne · 0:57
You. What an interesting topic. Definitely really great food for thought. I kind of went into what? Well, my job. It's interesting because it's related to what I got my graduate degree in. So my bachelor's degree I got in communicative disorders because I was thinking of becoming a speech language pathology assistant. I was kind of like, so so about it. And my first job afterwards was actually in education as a special education assistant instructional assistant

@MotivateMeU

It's because instead of taking into consideration the different ways that women operate, not only biologically but also sociologically with respect to who we care for, who we assist in and out of the washroom and so on, whether it's an elderly person or a young child or someone who needs additional assistance, et cetera, versus how men do those things, not to mention a woman's health and the various reasons we use the washroom in the different ways

@MotivateMeU Swell's reply buttons are not created equal.

Because right now, if you hit the reply button in the top right corner each time, then they have to guess if you replied to them specifically and which reply is for them, and if you leave five or six replies, then they have to listen to each one to figure out did you or did you not, and if so, again, which one is for me?
Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 0:37

@SeekingPlumb

Hey, Christina. So I think I got it right now. And thank you for clarifying that and educating me on that because I didn't know that if you hit the reply button in the upper right hand corner, that does something differently than when you hit it directly under the person's profile that's responding to you. So that makes sense
Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 3:05

@TheMs.Leanne

Hey, Leanne, interesting thing that you mentioned. And see, just like the students that in my classes, right? And I teach criminal justice, many of them. Well, it's hard to say. I mean, I'm just going, based upon the surveys and the research done by the college, that quite a few students in the field of criminal justice, which is what I teach in, decide to major in criminal justice, not because they want to get into the field at all
Michael Knight
@MK1981 · 2:43

@SeekingPlumb

It is going to be completely defund. No one's going to need it for anything, because the whole point of school is to get information that you can utilize to use in the real world. I won't need that. Most professions will be wiped out, at least all knowledge professions. This thing of just keep promoting it and promoting it at a deficit. You have to actually go into debt for something that's not going to work. That just doesn't make any sense

@MK1981 https://s.swell.life/SU57yQfrCIU7PRm

But when you look at then several decades ago, people having typically one career, their entire lives, versus a couple of decades ago where that wasn't the case anymore, let alone today, and then you incorporate tech and AI, like you said, the change that happened over those last year and the changes that are coming, it's happening so quickly
Tanya Coles
@MsColes77 · 3:37
I mean, it could be a number of reasons, but sometimes people's hearts, their passions change. After they get out of college, they realize, you know what? I don't want to go into that field. Or as they get older, they realize, you know what? I don't want to do this anymore. I want to change careers. I want to do something different. I want to follow my passion, you
Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 4:37

@MK1981

But in Erica's response, you'll hear her say the number of people she has encountered in life who have gotten into careers but majored in something totally different than the career that they're in. And like I said, I've encountered that as well. And I encountered that actually through my own students. Okay? However, here's the difference
Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 2:48

@MsColes77

So they're getting a degree simply because they're maybe going back to school, and they find that, okay, I need a degree to get an advancement or a promotion or to get into another field as a change of career. Everybody has their own reasons, okay? But they're focusing simply on their studies and getting that degree
Michael Knight
@MK1981 · 4:59

@MotivateMeU

Like, you need to take these specific credits and courses in order to be able to graduate, and that will prepare you for college or a trade of some sort. Whereas in college, there is no preparation. It's supposed to be self guided
Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 4:54

@MK1981

You know what? My question to them is always, so what are you going to do about it? Because you can do something about it. You can go out there, work for a company, work even for a government agency that has a tuition reimbursement program, and get college paid in full. Okay? And there's many companies you work for nowadays. You do not have to sign any contract that stipulates, well, you have to stay here for x amount of years
Rakesh Kumar
@RakeshKumar2023 · 1:19
It is seen all over the world that many people graduate with something else and in life they do something else and it is seen very common and many, many factors are there which are responsible for this kind of decision. So obviously you have taken a good topic and definitely it was great. Swell test
Bruno Pavlicek, PhD
@MotivateMeU · 2:25

@RakeshKumar2023

But I've met people who had concentrated degrees in the sciences and they get into business or some kind of totally different job from what they majored in or what they intended to get into. But to your point, yes, so many things happen in life that I guess it's fair to say in a nutshell, it's not cookie cutter, right? But there's many other advantages of going to college, getting your degree where the collective benefit supersedes whatever

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