@SeekingPlumb

Living lettuce??

And what are your thoughts? Okay, now I'm just having another thought. Perhaps this is not such a good thing if you're taking the entire bulb and putting it into the container when you give it to the buyer. Like if you were growing it in a field instead, then that plant cannot grow more leaves. Again, it's constantly producing. But if you grow it on water, take it out and give it to the buyer

(Photos to come.) #consumerism "sustainability #food

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@Tim
Tim Ereneta
@TimΒ Β·Β 1:33
I will say that my understanding is based on what I've learned about the hydroponic and greenhouse and warehouse farms in my area that use technology and are harvested by robots with the advantage of using a greenhouse is that you can pack in more plants to a smaller footprint and you can maximize the efficiency of your growing operation because with Led lighting. You can control the wavelength of the light. How much light it gets during the day. You can control the temperature
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@Ramya
Ramya V
@RamyaΒ Β·Β 1:49
Because when you harvest it as a single head and sell it, I think you just put it in the back of your fridge and after a couple of days, the leaves turn all soggy and then that's it. But in this way, you are going to kind of nurture this little plant and keep harvesting just the leaves alone, perhaps for your salad. And I feel you can keep it alive for a longer time, right? If that is how this concept works
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@SeekingPlumb

@Tim

And each time you grow something, presumably there's going to be a way to replicate growing it again, whether it's a piece of the plant or seed. The other thought was it's probably healthier, too, I would imagine, if it's grown in a greenhouse, everything is controlled like that, and then it goes straight into the packaging in the sense that there's not going to be pesticides and so on. So perhaps there's a little healthier aspect to it
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@SeekingPlumb

@Ramya

Continue to give me fresh lettuce for the foreseeable future until I theoretically accidentally kill it? Because then that would be like, super sustainable, right? You buy one plant or not plant just one thing of live lettuce, it continues to supply for you until at some point, perhaps it doesn't, but then you just buy another one. It would be like a house plant, so to speak. I like the idea. I don't know if it would work or not
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@SeekingPlumb

@Ramya

I also just wanna say that your lettuce lettuce looks awful scrumptious. I just want to I'm I'm I'm not going to chop down on it
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@Ramya
Ramya V
@RamyaΒ Β·Β 2:36

@SeekingPlumb

To your other question about whether you could take your living lettuce and plant it into regular soil, now, that's something that I'm not sure about because I'm assuming that all these saplings that they are giving out, I mean the lettuce that is being given out was hydroponically grown. That is soil less. So if you were to transplant it into a soil like medium, I am not very sure if it would be able to adapt to a drastic change in the medium of growth
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@Binati_Sheth
Binati Sheth
@Binati_ShethΒ Β·Β 3:13

@SeekingPlumb

And secondly, it relies on, as you say, water and water soluble nutrients. So in a hydroponic farm, you have to give it the nutrients that the crop was ideally getting from a soil. So at least it seems to be sustainable
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@SeekingPlumb

@Binati_Sheth

So thank you for that. All the way around. It seems like this is the ideal way to go with respect to any pesticides and preserving the lettuce freshness and sustainability and consistent output. And I don't see any downside to it except maybe like I often wonder about packaging when it comes to some of these things. Everything is done in plastic and if we were to do away with plastic, what would be the alternatives that would be sustainable? We're not seeing them yet
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@Binati_Sheth
Binati Sheth
@Binati_ShethΒ Β·Β 2:55

@SeekingPlumb

So it would create the same problem which hydroponic farming aspire to solve. And glass, I think glass might work, but again, if you have a farm setting where animals, birds, little kids, random workers within your endeavor, they might break it. So, yeah, I'm not hoping awful about the plastic stuff, but you're absolutely right, the plastic is a problem. Definitely is a problem. And I think it's going to remain as a problem
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@SeekingPlumb

@Binati_Sheth

Yeah. I completely agree plastics are necessary evil and they're not going anywhere I mean. They're a part of things we don't even always realize you know. Inside of machinery that typically looks mostly metal but there's a plastic component in there or know
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