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Rituparna Ghosh

@RituparnaGhosh
 · 4mo ago · 4:39
Do Storytellers like the sound of their voice?

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"…Hi, my name is Rituparna and I am a storyteller. I mean, yes, I tell stories for a living and sometimes I tell stories to live. I also help other people tell better stories in their business and their work in their life. This is my first forecast and I'm am very eager to see where this new medium and platform takes me. You know, the one thing that storytellers are accused of is that we like the sound of our own voice.…"

#Storytelling #PublicSpeaking #StorytellingWithRituparna

25

Aishani Chatterjee

@Aishani
 · 4mo ago · 4:03

"…Because until then, unless we are really getting into properly with our complete focus, we are getting into what other people are seeing, what they're expressing, I don't think it's possible for anyone to understand where the other people are coming from, what they are talking about and what their perspective is, what their point of views are. So yes, listening is definitely a very important component when it comes to storytelling or any sort of public speaking really.…"

2

Taha Abbas

@taha_oracle
 · 4mo ago · 5:00

"…Hi. Welcome to Swell. And that's a really nice topic. And you have a wonderful energy, great voice. Well, in my opinion, I think most storytellers are not interested in what they sound like, if that's a true storyteller. Their focus is to tell stories, to entertain people or communicate their truth through any form. You can tell stories through different means. But of course, we are talking about speaking in general. People do feel selfconscious.…"

1

J.L. Beasley

@Her_Sisu
 · 4mo ago · 3:52

"…There are times when the storyteller needs to be present and to listen and to engage, lean in, ask questions from a space of curiosity, to understand. Then there is a time when the storyteller needs to engage. They need to listen. They need to lean in, they need to be present and to emphasize a point, to make a concept clearer, to express a sense of hope, a sense of encouragement, a moment of resiliency, a moment of understanding. They might share a story.…"

2

Sreeja V

@Wordsmith
 · 4mo ago · 2:32

"…And especially if you are a storyteller by profession, I'm sure that this must be something that you do day in, day out and getting the bulk of the audience and listening to what they have to say so that you are able to provide them the kind of content that they would like to engage with, they would like to absorb and derive value from.…"

2

Rituparna Ghosh

@RituparnaGhosh
 · 4mo ago · 3:48

@Aishani

"…Sometimes it's easy to go overboard with this sense of overwhelming sense of importance for what the storyteller feels about himself or herself and the voice that they have in that conversation. So thank you so much for adding your perspective and listening to me and welcoming me on Sarcast. I'm following you and I hope to listen to you very soon.…"

2

Rituparna Ghosh

@RituparnaGhosh
 · 4mo ago · 4:32

@taha_oracle

"…You can tell a story from whichever point that you are in. And another interesting thing is that everybody feels that you have to the telling becomes more important than the story. But coming from where I am as a professional storytellers, sound voice, a trainer and a coach, I tell people that the ultimate winner in this entire ecosystem, in the entire world is a story.…"

1

Aayan Banerjee

@BasTalk
 · 4mo ago · 4:44

@RituparnaGhosh

"…There are those who are unstoppable if you keep on going without any semicolon or full stop. And your listening ability is severely tested. And that's where I fail miserably. Sometimes I lose it, but I'm trying, and hopefully I'll get around to improving my listening skills. But I enjoyed listening to your delivery. Your voice quality is excellent, and the choice of words that you use to highlight your point are fabulous.…"

1

Rituparna Ghosh

@RituparnaGhosh
 · 4mo ago · 1:50

@Jayaram1961

"…I don't think it's not allowed. But I do think as a storyteller, it's a fantastic opportunity to utilize this format on Swell to make episodes out of your story. Now, whether you think five minutes is enough for it or you want to do a shorter well, it's completely up to you. I think it's a good idea. And you can perhaps break up your story into ten parts and do it over ten days or maybe over a week on Monday to us Sunday.…"

Rituparna Ghosh

@RituparnaGhosh
 · 4mo ago · 3:53

@Wordsmith

"…But as creators, as content creators, we also go into this whole realm of falling in love with our content so much that we don't want any negative comment. We don't want people not to listen to us. We want people to we also want to dictate how people should respond to our content.…"

Samreen Faiz

@samreen
 · 4mo ago · 1:25

"…Hi, Rituparna. Welcome to swell. And I'm hoping that you have a great time in here. You surely will. And apart from that, the question which you asked, I definitely agree. I mean, I definitely like listening to my own voice and the way I'm articulating these sentences because it really helps me to become better at it every single day.…"

1

Binati Sheth

@Binati_Sheth
 · 4mo ago · 1:29

@RituparnaGhosh

"…I think there's nothing wrong with liking the sound of your own voice. Because if you, as a storyteller cannot tolerate your own stories, how can you expect your audiences to want to continue to listen to you? Right? So I think this is something a lot of video editors who edit their own stuff give us advice. Because I've been learning video editing, so I was watching a lot of these videos.…"

3

Ramya V

@Ramya
 · 4mo ago · 1:42

"…And to the question as to whether storytellers love the sound of their voices a bit too much, then I think that's a no brainer. They absolutely do. For a fact, I know that no matter how I sound, be it squeaky or stuttery or boring, my voice is a reflection of my singular perspective. It is true to who I am. I can change my voice as a writer, but I couldn't when I'm actually talking to somebody. Right?…"

1

Georgie Dee

@GeorgieDee
 · 4mo ago · 5:00

@RituparnaGhosh

"…I think it's a really important communication form in our world for people to connect and also to pass on messages and meaning where sometimes if you were to break it down into a very scientific lecture with points and bullet points and this is my next point it's not as poetic. We can't absorb it as well as a story, which is creative. It's got characters, it's got a narrative, it's got structure. We enjoy that.…"

3

Rituparna Ghosh

@RituparnaGhosh
 · 4mo ago · 3:53

@GeorgieDee

"…Hi Georgie. Thank you so much for that wonderful, wonderful reply to my swell, my first swell cast. What really fascinated me is how you brought in two wonderful stories from your life and ensure that you already are a fantastic storyteller. Yes, you are right. Storytelling is a profession, and I am also a professional storyteller. And I tell stories to children, to educators. I design story curriculum for schools. I am a trainer in story pedagogy.…"

1

Rituparna Ghosh

@RituparnaGhosh
 · 4mo ago · 1:35

@Ramya

"…I think the fact that a storyteller is not just known for the voice, and voice is not the physical voice, but it's also the opinion, the perspective, the ideology, the personality that the storyteller brings with it. And somewhere along the line, it is also about making room for other people's perspectives. So I think that's a wonderful, fascinating thing about being a storyteller today. Thank you so much for this warm welcome, and I look forward to having such more engaging conversations.…"

1

Rituparna Ghosh

@RituparnaGhosh
 · 4mo ago · 3:05

@Binati_Sheth

"…And somewhere there is this gap between how it's interpreted, how a story is interpreted by the audience and how it was intended by the storyteller is where the problem comes in. If you're in love with what you wanted to tell and not care about what people understood your words, then you are I'd like you to fall into a trap. So it was great talking to you. Thank you so much for sharing your perspective.…"

1

Binati Sheth

@Binati_Sheth
 · 4mo ago · 3:42

@RituparnaGhosh

"…And I totally see what you mean when people refuse to make changes because they love it so much. I think there's a word for this. There's something called killer, darlings. It was quoted by Stephen King, I believe, I'm not sure, I forgot. But the killer darlings is this concept that when you sit in, edit, delete everything that you love that your audience might not because ultimately you are writing for other people as well as yourself and you can always do better.…"

2

Sapna Gupta

@shortswithsapna
 · 4mo ago · 0:09

"…Rituhai, good to see you here too. Look forward to more of your perspectives. Have always enjoyed them on LinkedIn.…"

2

Rituparna Ghosh

@RituparnaGhosh
 · 4mo ago · 0:28

@shortswithsapna

"…Hi, Sapna. So nice to see you here. And I'm glad that we connected on LinkedIn and you follow my content there. Is this something that you would like me to talk about on Swell or on LinkedIn? Because I think it's a nice opportunity to interact with people who follow somebody's content and to suggest to them what they want to hear, read, or listen about. So if you have any suggestions, I'd love to know. Thank you so much.…"

Sreeja V

@Wordsmith
 · 4mo ago · 1:12

@GeorgieDee

"…You said, you know, you should let the young minds do their own thing in that sense. You said that you were watching from afar as your young friend decided to be with this guy. Right. Love that phrase that you used and it is so true as well, I think, because there are some lessons learned as experiences and then some others which can be learned by our stories. So beautiful share there, Jodi. Thank you.…"

saranya iyer

@saranyatales
 · 4mo ago · 1:00

"…No matter how well versed you are about the topic or the subject or the story that you are going, you're narrating. If you lack confidence and everything goes for it all, it will start to show in your voice like a little quiver here and a little twitch there, leading the audience's attention to drift away. So I feel in order to boost confidence in your voice, first you need to like your voice. Then, once you have achieved confidence, you can easily connect with the audience.…"

1

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